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. . . Of The Week

 

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Our Staff Member(s) of the Week

 

Camp Cook Assistants

Burt Toast & Russell Upsumgrub

 

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Cartoon Of The Week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quote Of The Week

 

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”
― Martin Luther King Jr., A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches

 

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Ponderable Of The Week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bible Verse Of The Week

 

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Word Of The Week

tour de force

[ toor duh -fawrs ]

 

noun

a feat requiring unusual strength, skill, or ingenuity.

 

ORIGIN

Tour de force “a feat requiring unusual strength, skill, or ingenuity” is a borrowing from French, in which the phrase literally means “turn of strength.” French tour has two separate derivations: the noun tour “a turn” in tour de force is related to the verb tourner “to turn” (from Latin tornāre), and this tour is not to be confused with tour “tower” (from Latin turris). This distinction is why the Tour de France refers to a long, winding bicycle race while the tour Eiffel is the original French name for the Eiffel Tower. Other derivatives of Latin tornāre “to turn” include return, tourniquet, tourist, and tornado. Tour de force was first recorded in English circa the year 1800.

 

USAGE

“The idea that nature is not bound by the artificial boundaries that we assign to physics, chemistry, biology or mathematics has been around a long time,” said astrophysicist Mayank Vahia …. He said the Nobel prize in physiology and medicine shared by Jim Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins, for instance, for unraveling the double helix structure of DNA, might not have been won but for the technical (read physical) tour de force of X-ray diffraction studies achieved by Rosalind Franklin and her colleagues.

VITHAL C. NADKARNI, “A BRAVE NEW BRAND OF SCIENCE,” THE TIMES OF INDIA, OCTOBER 17, 2009

 

A tour de force from 1938, by the German-born Argentine Annemarie Heinrich in league with her sister Ursula, finds the two reflected in a mirrored orb. In the background—from our point of view—Annemarie grins as she snaps the shutter of a standing camera; Ursula looms gigantically and wildly distorted as she leans forward to grasp the sphere. It takes time, enjoyably, to puzzle out the picture’s vertiginous structure.

PETER SCHJELDAHL, "THE PHOTOGRAPHS THAT WOMEN TOOK," THE NEW YORKER, AUGUST 2, 2021

© 2022 Dictionary.com, LLC

 

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Joke of the Week

If you love something, set it free. If it comes back, it will always be yours.  If it doesn’t come back, it was never yours, to begin with,

But, if it just sits in your living room, messes up your stuff, eats your food, uses your telephone, takes your money, and doesn’t appear to realize that you set it free . . . . You either married it or gave it birth.

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Something To Think About . . . 

 

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